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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail
We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.
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 implementation of bi for computer industry


An Overview of Product Lifecycle Management Implementation Challenges
Product lifecycle management (PLM) implementation brings its own set of challenges, whether considering vendor selection, employee perception management, or

implementation of bi for computer industry  (CIOs) who drive the implementation of systems such as PLM should have a clear vision and roadmap of what is to be done, and what they want to achieve with it. The CIO's initial role with PLM is that of change agent, through working with engineering to sell the business case to senior management. From there, they need to oversee a cross-functional PLM project team charged with mapping and defining common business processes. With the engineering and operations groups as co-sponsors, they need to launch a

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Software Functionality Revealed in Detail

We’ve opened the hood on every major category of enterprise software. Learn about thousands of features and functions, and how enterprise software really works.

Get free sample report
Compare Software Solutions

Visit the TEC store to compare leading software by functionality, so that you can make accurate and informed software purchasing decisions.

Compare Now

Business Intelligence (BI) RFI / RFP Template

Reporting and Analysis, Analytics, Data Warehousing, Workflow, Data Integration, Support, and System Requirements  

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Documents related to » implementation of bi for computer industry

Business Intelligence: A Guide for Midsize Companies


Business intelligence (BI) is not a new concept. What’s new is that BI tools are now accessible for midsize companies. Managers can use BI to analyze complex information to support their decision-making processes, combining data from a variety of sources to get an integrated, 360-degree view of the company. Find out how to select the right BI software, the right vendor, and the right approach to implementing BI.

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BI State of the Market Report


IT departments rarely know as much about a business as the business people themselves. But business people rarely take action on numbers alone: they share the information with others, soliciting their feedback and performing external research before taking action. Business users still depend on IT to deliver answers related to the information that they receive. Business intelligence (BI) 2.0—also known as collaborative BI—uses the collective intelligence of the user community to enrich existing information. Learn how business intelligence (BI) 2.0 is helping business users create and modify their own reports, share and enrich information, and provide feedback to each other and to information producers.

When the community helps itself, information is turned into actionable information more quickly than when using purely “traditional” methods of community support, such as meetings, phone calls, and e-mail. And when actions are taken more quickly, the entire organization becomes more nimble and ultimately more competitive. This overview discusses how BI 2.0 can provide real benefits within your organization and what product features to look for in a BI solution in order to realize those benefits.

We hope you’ll find this guide a useful tool in determining which BI solution is best suited to your company’s business model and particular needs.


Table of Contents


Executive Overview
Using BI 2.0 to Increase your Competitive Advantage

Case Study
LogiXML Helps to Power its Real-Estate Reporting and Analysis

Thought Leadership
How Smart Marketers Succeed Online

Market Insight
Mashups and Pervasive BI

Report Sponsors
LogiXML

IBM

About TEC



Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.



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Using BI 2.0 to Increase Your Competitive Advantage


Business users know their data better than IT does. They know the meaning of the data, its history, and its relationship with other data. Yet traditional BI solutions have business users referring to IT for assistance with their data. Also, they are forced to work in silos. Sure, they can create their own reports and maybe even share them with other business users, but when it comes to sharing their own knowledge about the data, they have to rely on e-mail, telephone, and face-to-face meetings. By enabling the sharing of data-related knowledge through the BI system itself, business users become more self-sufficient and actions can be taken more quickly.

The raison d’être of BI is to provide business users with information that enables them to take action. Even if business users are self-sufficient when it comes to creating and sharing data, data on its own is rarely sufficient to take action. Identifying an opportunity in the market through numbers alone is not sufficient to justify investment in a new product or geography. Identifying a bottleneck in a business process is not sufficient to justify changes in the business process. Information about a business issue or opportunity is merely a part of the overall “solution domain.” Action is usually only taken after considering a number of factors in addition to the data, such as human knowledge and experience, the economic environment, and the competitive environment.

In this section, we lay out the capabilities to look for in a BI solution—and specific functional requirements needed to support these capabilities—that contribute to the goal of “harnessing collective intelligence.” In general, the more recent entrants into the BI market are paying the most attention to BI 2.0. Some vendors, such as Good Data, have it as a central component of their solution offerings.

The following are key capabilities of BI 2.0:

  • Collaboration
    Business users are able to share information within the user community and create discussion threads relating to the information.


  • Identification of useful information
    Business users can flag information that is likely to be of use to others within the community.


  • Enriching of Information
    Business users can enrich the information through their knowledge and experience in addition to other external information sources in order to explain trends and generally assist other consumers of that information.


The community of “business users” needn’t be restricted to internal users. User collaboration is already mature within the Web space, under the guise of Web 2.0. With Web 2.0, collective intelligence is harnessed through comments on blog posts; contributions to wikis such as Wikipedia; and tagging of content, such as photos on Flickr. BI 2.0 takes these methods and applies them in the BI space by making data the focus of user collaboration.

The following sections take the capabilities above and list the functional requirements that support them. Bear in mind that each of these functional requirements is a business user requirement and not an IT or development requirement.


Download the full copy of the TEC 2009 BI Buyer’s Guide for businesses.

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Why .NET Technology Is Important for ERP


.NET technology is a wake-up call, and some people are sleeping through it! Remaining competitive means mission-critical software systems, such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) applications, must be designed from the ground up for connectivity and integration. But software developers don’t advertise their shortcomings, and some ERP vendors—and by association, their customers—are being left behind.

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Dashboard Development and Deployment-A Methodology for Success


A dashboard is a vital tool for monitoring the daily health of your organization. From a single interface, decision makers have access to key performance indicators (KPI)—actionable information that can be used to effectively guide and track business performance. Successful implementation of a dashboard is complex and requires a step-by-step process using a methodology that considers all aspects of the project life cycle.

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Forrester’s Ideal Tool Set For Application Performance Management For Better Business Performance


In this white paper, Forrester Consulting evaluates issues surrounding the management of IT transactions, applications, and business services. A survey was conducted of 159 professionals with direct responsibility for business-critical applications. All enterprises surveyed had fundamental issues while managing the performance of these applications and business services.

Each evolution of application technology and business services has brought another level of complexity and has increased the obsolescence of traditional IT management processes and tools, especially in the area of proactive performance management. Numerous studies have directly linked business productivity, revenue, and client satisfaction with application performance management (APM).

The survey data shows a number of trends that make an ideal management solution, including the understanding of the customer experience and the ability to bring together data from infrastructure components in a way that allows it to be shared by the issue investigation teams.

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What to Look For in a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Application for Small Businesses


At one time, CRM systems required a massive software investment that only the largest organizations could afford, with complex custom integrations and user interfaces that required weeks or months of training and dedicated in-house IT staff. But today, affordable, user-friendly CRM applications that are made specifically with small businesses in mind are easily available.

This is good news for small businesses, but it creates a new challenge: How do you select the best CRM application for your organization?

This white paper gives four key considerations for choosing a CRM solution, and outlines the main benefits of "going CRM" (and the features and capabilities that make them possible) based on a recent survey of more than 1,200 small business CRM users.

If your company has outgrown Excel, and using email to track your customers has become overwhelming, it's more than likely time to move to a CRM application. Read this white paper for tips on what to look for in a CRM application that will take your business to the next level.

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Advanced project for Microsoft Dynamics AX: ERP for Services (Non-manufacturing) Competitor Analysis Report


The enterprise resource planning (ERP) for services knowledge base is appropriate for organizations in service-oriented industries. It consists of enterprise-wide integrated information systems that manage the operations, services, and resources of non-manufacturing organizations.

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New DoD Regulations for the Cybersecurity Age: Implementing and Paying for the DFARS UCTI Safeguarding Contract Clause


The Department of Defense (DoD)’s acquisition clause on safeguarding unclassified controlled technical information (UCTI) affects DoD contractors of all sizes. Failure to comply with the requirements or to report a cyber incident now constitutes a breach and could result in fines or contract termination. Aronson’s white paper addresses many of the issues surrounding the new clause, including its implications for your business and how to comply.

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Buying ERP for Manufacturing: What to Look for in a Cloud-Based Solution


SaaS-based software for manufacturers? The idea is rapidly gaining ground as manufacturers become aware of all the benefits a cloud-based ERP system can bring to their operations.

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The Integration Factor: The Inherent Value of Best-of-Class Enterprise Solutions


Monolithic ERP systems have proved inflexible in a period of change. The cost of maintenance and modifications are often prohibitively expensive. Yet most best-of-class applications generally lack strong integration tools. As a result, many companies cannot support change effectively. See how you can supplement the capabilities of your legacy ERP solutions with a flexible, innovative financial management system-and thrive during change.

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